Shopify vs WooCommerce

Reprint Article from ecommerce-platforms.com

Shopify vs WooCommerce – to say it simply, these are the two most popular eCommerce platforms available on the market.

Each one has multiple strengths and can possibly be the perfect solution for you to build an eCommerce store with. And the best news is that you can do so all on your own, without any help from professional designers and/or developers. But we’ll get to that later.First,  which one of the two is actually going to fit your specific needs better,Shopify or WooCommerce (for creating a fantastic online shop)? Which is more feature-rich? Which is cheaper? Which is better-looking? Which is more flexible? Which is the easiest to work with? … 

This is a lot of questions, but we’re going to answer then all in this in-depth comparison. After reading it,  you will know exactly which platform to choose based on your individual needs  and on the type of eCommerce store that you want to run. Here’s Shopify vs WooCommerce – which one is the absolute best:

Shopify vs WooCommerce

Shopify vs WooCommerce – Design

For websites – and especially eCommerce stores – design is everything. Users simply don’t trust a site that doesn’t have the right aesthetic or doesn’t function as well as it should.

How Shopify does design

One of Shopify‘s greatest selling points is the visual quality of the themes. In my opinion, they look absolutely great even out of the box. Shopify comes with more than 100 different store templates, of which 20+ are free. The best part is that they are all mobile responsive and have a variety of different coloring options. These templates are no joke, they have a fashionably sleek and clean aesthetic, which makes it perfect for modern, forward-thinking websites.

shopify designs

Shopify’s designs aren’t created in-house, by the way; they’re outsourced to a group of professional web designers who ensure they’re as current and as engaging as they can be.

Unfortunately, the price tags on the premium ones go as high as even $180 a piece. But what you get in exchange is great design.

Luckily, as I mentioned, there are free options available too.

shopify free designs

Perversely, the instant attraction of Shopify designs can cause many webmasters to select the same themes. Some Shopify users who have designed a site themselves have later complained of looking a little too similar to other websites. For that reason, customization is encouraged.

Happily, Shopify is easy to chop and change. You can easily amend colors and styles, while more adept developers can utilise the platform’s specialized ‘Liquid’ language to make more substantial changes and really make a brand stand out from the rest.

How WooCommerce does design

As with many other aspects of the WooCommerce experience, when it comes to aesthetics, the world is your oyster – you just have to put the hours in.

WooCommerce is a plugin created by the developers from WooThemes (and acquired by Automattic). As such, it doesn’t deliver any specific design traits on its own. What it does is it provides you with the means to sell products and services online. The design part, however, is left to your current WordPress theme.

That being said, WooCommerce has been built to cooperate with most themes on the market, provided that they follow the standard recommendations and best practices.

This means that, in most cases, you are able to select any WordPress theme that you like, and still make it work together with WooCommerce.

However, you will also come across themes that have been built with WooCommerce in mind from the get-go, and are tailor-made to make all your product / service listings look great. If the design of the eCommerce store itself is particularly important to you, you should perhaps look into some of those themes.

The place to start would be Woo’s own default online store theme called Storefront (free). It’s a really efficient creation that puts focus on all the important elements of an eCommerce store, and helps you sell more effectively.

Storefront

You can also get a range of child themes for Storefront in case you want to customize the look of your store further. Most of those are available at $39 a piece (occasionally, though, there are themes with price tags as high as $119).

child themes for Storefront

Apart from that, you can also look into marketplaces like ThemeForest where you can find tens or even hundreds of other WooCommerce-compatible themes.

To be honest, WooCommerce has a serious advantage over Shopify when it comes to designs. What I mean is simply the fact that, setting aside the specific WooCommerce themes, you can basically make any WordPress theme work with the platform, and there are thousands of those things on the web.

Shopify vs WooCommerce – Price

Every webmaster wants slightly more bang for their buck, but the two platforms have really different approaches to pricing:

The main difference between Shopify pricing and WooCommerce pricing

To say this quite bluntly, Shopify pricing is very clear and straightforward. WooCommerce’s isn’t.

On the one hand, WooCommerce is free. Or, I should say, as open source software, it is technically free – you can download it for free straight from WordPress.org. No strings attached. But then, you find out that to actually launch a working eCommerce store with it, you need to get ready to spend money (we’ll get into specifics in a minute).

In simple terms, Shopify is all about delivering you a single, out-of-the-box solution with one price tag on it. You get it, you “unwrap the box”, and you get to use your shiny new eCommerce store right away, since everything you need is included from the get-go.

With WooCommerce, on the other hand, what you actually get is a box with just the engine of your eCommerce store in it. But to then make that engine run, you need to find an empty car to put it in, so to speak. (Where by “car” I actually mean things like hosting, domain, working WordPress setup, etc.)

Here’s a table that should make the costs involved with each platforms easier to grasp:

Note. Both Shopify and WooCommerce offer you a handful of tiers / options to upgrade your version of the platform depending on the type of your business, the scale of your sales, etc. To simplify this comparison, I’m going to focus on the cheapest path – what it costs, at the minimum to have a working eCommerce store with Shopify vs WooCommerce.

Shopify vs WooCommerce pricing
Software Hosting Subdomain SSL certificate Top-level domain
Shopify $29 / month Included for free $9 / year
WooCommerce $0 $5-$100 / month (via 3rd party) n/a $100+ / year (via 3rd party) $9+ / year (via 3rd party)

When we sum things up, the above translates into:

  • Shopify eCommerce store running on a top-level domain: $29.75 / month.
  • WooCommerce store on the same setup: $29 / month (a modest $20 hosting, domain, SSL).

As you can see, even though the WooCommerce software is free, to actually get it to run an actual eCommerce store costs basically the same as Shopify.

But that’s not all. With WooCommerce, you might also have to factor in the additional extensions for things like SEO, more payment gateways, and so on. Those extensions are usually around the $49-79 mark (one time payment).

What it all comes down to is that although WooCommerce is technically the cheaper solution, it will require much more work to set it up, and you’ll need to be much more careful not to go over your budget, as every additional extension comes with a price tag. In the end, with WooCommerce, you’re exchanging dollars for features.

Shopify can boast a much more conventional pricing structure. It has a sliding scale of packages which offer users a range of different features up front – Basic ($29), Professional ($79) and Unlimited ($299).

Feel free to check out another resource of ours, where we focus primarily on the different pricing options available with Shopify + which one to choose.

Last but not least, there are the transaction fees. In essence, whenever you sell something with either of the platforms, they will charge you a small fee (for processing the payment, delivering the money to your account, etc.). Those fees change quite often, so I won’t get into that here, but just be aware that they exist. Usually, they sit around 2%-3% per transaction, but make sure to check the exact numbers before signing up with either of the platforms.

Shopify vs WooCommerce – Features

While both platforms’ approaches to pricing are different, they’re relatively similar when it comes to giving your eCommerce site that little va va voom. Unlike a platform like Bigcommerce, Shopify and WooCommerce don’t bombard the user with plenty of tricks and toys.

However, both have enviable app stores that can be raided for the latest money-making features.

How Shopify helps you sell

Although you will probably need to install apps to make the most of the platform, Shopify offers significantly more free options. From the very start Shopify allows you to have:

  • Unlimited number of products
  • Unlimited file storage
  • Automatic fraud analysis
  • Manual order creation
  • Discount codes
  • Blog module
  • Free SSL certificate
  • Mobile commerce optimization
  • Editable HTML and CSS
  • Credit card payments
  • Multiple languages
  • Adjustable shipping rates and taxes
  • Customer profiles
  • Drop shipping capabilities
  • SEO-ready site structure
  • Individual product reviews
  • Facebook selling module
  • Social media integration
  • Physical and digital products in the store
  • Unlimited traffic to your store
  • Daily backups
  • Site stats and product reports
  • Fully featured mobile app
  • Product importing via CSV files
  • Different product variations
  • Print orders
  • Gift cards (on Professional and Unlimited)
  • Abandoned cart recovery (on Professional and Unlimited)

In comparison, some of these free features, such as CSV uploads, shipping options and Facebook selling will set you back up to $500-600 to get started on WooCommerce.

Aside from the basic options, there are hundreds of different features that can be installed from the Shopify App Store. Like with WordPress, you certainly won’t short of inspiration. Nor will you be bemoaning the apps’ poor quality.

How WooCommerce helps you sell

As open source software, WordPress is well known for allowing third party developers to create various extensions and plugins. WooCommerce taps into that further by offering lots of interesting and exciting additions. Whether you want to easily edit aesthetics, sell on Facebook, ramp up email marketing techniques, understand user behaviour or quite frankly do anything else, you’ll be able to.

Here’s what you’ll find inside WooCommerce:

  • You can sell physical products, digital products (including software and apps), plus it’s also good for affiliate marketing
  • Payments via PayPal and Stripe built-in (plus a range of other gateways available for an extra fee)
  • Adjustable shipping rates and taxes
  • Unlimited number of products and product categories
  • Stock levels control
  • Mobile-friendly structure
  • You have complete control over your data
  • Works with your current WordPress theme
  • Literally hundreds of plugins (extensions) available

Shopify vs WooCommerce features compared side by side

Just to make all of the above easier to grasp, here’s a side-by-side comparison of the most essential eCommerce features in Shopify and WooCommerce:

Shopify vs WooCommerce side by side
Shopify WooCommerce
Is a subscription-based tool/service + a complete, out-the-box eCommerce solution. Is a free WordPress plugin. It requires a web server and a working WordPress installation to run.
 The core similarities and differences 
Allows you to sell whatever you wish (physical, digital, products, services).
Use it online (eCommerce store) + offline (via Shopify’s “Point of Sale” kit). Use it online only (eCommerce store).
24/7 email, chat, and phone support. Ticket support, and forum support.
Closed platform – you can only modify your store to the extent that Shopify allows. Open source – you can modify your store freely; there are no limitations.
Shopify controls your store/website data. You have complete control over your data.
 Your eCommerce store design 
More than 100 store design available (20+ of them free). Thousands of store designs available (through WordPress themes).
Mobile-friendly structure.
 Other similarities and differences 
Hosting included. No hosting included.
Free subdomain included with every plan (e.g. YOURSTORE.shopify.com). No subdomain included.
Free SSL certificate. You can hook up a free SSL certificate manually.
Unlimited file storage. File storage limited by your web host.
Sell an unlimited number of products.
Create/use coupon codes and discounts.
Accept payments via PayPal, multiple payment gateways (including Stripe, credit cards), bank deposits, cash on delivery, and other methods. Accept payments via PayPal, Stripe, checks, bank transfers, cash on delivery.
Sales stats and reports.
Native support for multiple languages. Support for multiple languages via third-party plugins.
Adjustable shipping rates and taxes.

As you can see, there’s nothing particularly important that’s missing from either platform. Choosing one over the other can often come down to your personal preference, or your thoughts on the value (or lack thereof) of open source software vs the rest.

Try-Shopify

But, the devil is in the details. At the end of the day, Shopify seems like a more laser-focused solution of the two (at least to me). Everything that Shopify offers is geared at making your online store more functional and easy to use. With WooCommerce, albeit the platform is extremely feature-rich and doesn’t lack any specific eCommerce feature, it’s still an add-on to WordPress – a plugin.

In the end, though, there’s no clear winner here in the features department. Both platforms have everything that a standard eCommerce setup could need.

Ease of use

Okay, so since we haven’t had a clear winner when it comes to eCommerce features, maybe we can have one in regards to the ease of use – aka. how easy it is to set up a working eCommerce store with either platform.

How easy to use is Shopify

The main strength of Shopify is that it’s a subscription-based online tool. In other words, to use it, all you need to do is visit Shopify.com, click the sign up button, go through a basic setup wizard, and you’re done.

Shopify is going to help you along the way, asking about the purpose/nature of your store (what you’re planning to sell), and giving you some overall tips as to which design/structure to choose and how to set everything up.

Once you get through that initial wizard, you will get access to the main dashboard. It’s from there that you can create your new eCommerce store, add new products, and so on.

Shopify dashboard

Overall, the whole process is very straightforward, and most importantly, you don’t need any design or site-building skills in order to get through it.

Later on – once you have the store running – you can access every crucial option from the sidebar of the dashboard:

Shopify sidebar

This sort of organization should make your daily work in the store very easy to grasp.

When it comes to adding new products to your store, handling sales, orders and etc., it’s also equally intuitive. For example, when adding a product, all product parameters are available from a single panel, so you don’t have to visit different areas of the dashboard to set things like the name, price, images, stock levels, and etc.

Here’s what the “new product” screen looks like:

Shopify add product

Overall, Shopify is a very intuitive solution, and the best thing about it is that you can just sign up and create a store right away, with no unexpected interruptions.

How easy to use is WooCommerce

To some extent, WooCommerce is just as easy to use as Shopify. But there’s a catch.

The catch is that although working with your store day by day is just as simple as with Shopify, setting up the store isn’t.

Basically, since WooCommerce is a WordPress plugin – a piece of software – and not a subscription-based solution like Shopify, this means that you need to handle a couple of things before you ever get to working with WooCommerce itself.

Mainly, you need to do these:

  1. Get a domain name
  2. Sign up for a hosting account
  3. Install WordPress
  4. Find and install a WordPress theme

It is only after you have those four taken care of that you can install the WooCommerce plugin on your WordPress website and start getting through the configuration of your online store.

Unfortunately, those steps do require some level of comfort around web-related things. After all, it involves setting up your web server, redirecting your domain to said server, and lastly getting WordPress properly installed and made operational.

To make that somewhat easier on yourself, you can choose a specialized WordPress hosting company that will take care of the domain and WordPress installation for you, leaving only the WooCommerce part to you. Either way, it’s all significantly more difficult than Shopify’s one-click, “sign up” button.

And also, the theme – your design. WooCommerce doesn’t come with any “design” per se. It is all handled via a WordPress theme of your choice. Luckily, WooCommerce works with basically all themes on the market, but it’s still on you to find one you like and install it on the site.

Now, about WooCommerce itself:

As I said, the platform in itself is just as easy to use as Shopify. The second you get the WooCommerce plugin installed and activated, you’ll see the on-screen setup wizard. It consists of five(-ish) steps and takes you by the hand through every crucial element.

wocommerce wizard

Basically, it lets you choose/approve the main parameters of the store, and get everything neatly configured. For example, some of the important steps involve things like currency settings, shipping and tax, and payment gateways.

Once the installation is done, you can start using your store and begin adding products.

I showed you Shopify’s “add product” page above, so now let’s look at WooCommerce’s:

woocommerce add product

As you can see, it’s very much the same. Only some of the details are showcased slightly differently.

Which is easier to us, Shopify or WooCommerce?

Because of the initial hassle involved in setting up a WooCommerce store, I have to give this round to Shopify.

The fact that you can just click the sign up button and then have the whole store set up within minutes is very impressive in Shopify.

Later on, however, once you’re working with the store on a daily basis, Shopify and WooCommerce both present a similar level of ease of use. So I guess the choice is up to you, and involves answering the question if the more difficult setup in WooCommerce is a deal breaker for you or not…

Shopify vs WooCommerce – Support

There’s also the not insubstantial issue of technical support. Shopify is renowned for the high quality of its customer care. Each client can enjoy 24/7 access to a customer adviser in case they have any issues or queries (via email, open chat, phone call).

Apart from that, you also get access to an extensive knowledge base that covers some of the common user questions and problem solutions.

Shopify support

The matter of support with WooCommerce isn’t as straightforward. First off, WooCommerce is a free WordPress plugin in itself. This means that you can get support through the WordPress forums. However, at the same time, the WooCommerce team also enables everyone to create a free user account over at WooCommerce.com and get support there.

WooCommerce support

Lastly, WooCommerce is an open source product just like WordPress. This means that you can jump into the source code yourself, and try solving things on your own (if you’re brave enough).

In the end, I have to give the support round to Shopify. Nothing beats 24/7 access to a support person.

Shopify vs WooCommerce – SEO

Any website that wants to make a splash needs strong SEO. Luckily, both contenders here have a lot going for them.

How Shopify helps with SEO

Shopify may come second when we look at the overall volume of SEO features available, but there’s certainly no shame in the way that it presents content. It too handles basic SEO practices like meta information and site copy with ease. So long as your business is producing quality content, there’s no reason to suggest you won’t enjoy great results and strong user engagement.

Site wide, there are plenty of ways that Shopify proves to beat WooCommerce in the SEO game. It’s actually renowned by developers like me as having some of the cleanest code out there and natural linking structure, which offers a smooth user experience and in turn enhances visibility in search engine rankings.

One interesting case that’s worth pointing out is what happened to the Lost Cyclist, an eCommerce expert. When he moved his site from Shopify to WooCommerce, he noticed that the traffic dropped markedly:

Shopify vs Woocommerce

(If you’d like to dig deeper into how different shopping cart platforms can help your business with SEO, you might want to read this post.)

What’s more, Shopify is fast. Because it’s a hosted platform that’s built on huge infrastructure, Shopify offers each of its webmasters rapid loading pages (80 milliseconds, to be exact). As a result, shops stand a better chance of ranking well and a better chance of leading customers to conversions.

How WooCommerce helps with SEO

WordPress is primarily a content creation platform, and it’s renowned by SEO experts as one of the most reliable options available. It’s easy to add and edit content as well as meta information to ensure that your pages have a strong chance of ranking for specific keywords.

With plugins such as Yoast SEO, you can make your WordPress site highly optimized, and be in full control of every little detail that’s SEO-related.

When it comes to WooCommerce itself, it simply takes advantage of what’s already there in WordPress, or what’s available through third-party plugins like the aforementioned Yoast SEO, or the WooCommerce-dedicated version of the Yoast plugin.

In the end, WooCommerce gives you more SEO-specific options overall, purely because of the fact that it’s built on top of WordPress, which has pretty much unlimited SEO potential. This doesn’t mean, however, that you’re going to suffer from an SEO point of view if you choose Shopify (as one case study mentioned above points out).

Shopify vs WooCommerce: Conclusion

Comparisons such as this are never cut and dry. When I talk with clients, my recommendations always fluctuate depending on their specific situations.

Here are my recommendations  based on the type of user that you are / what you expect from your eCommerce platform: 

Shopify)

  • You appreciate a hands-off approach, where you can just sign up “somewhere” and have an eCommerce store launched as a result of it.
  • You don’t want to have to deal with any of the setup yourself, and you don’t mind paying a fee to have everything taken care of for you.
  • At the same time, you want a highly optimized solution that’s in no way worse than what the competition has.
  • You want to have a reliable and fast-responding support team at your disposal, just in case you have any questions.
  • You basically don’t care about any of the technical details of your eCommerce platform … you just want it to work as expected, and be accessible to all customers and on all devices (mobile and desktop).
WooCommerce)
  • You want to be in full control of your eCommerce store.
  • You want to have access to thousands of site designs and thousands of plugins that will enable you to extend the functionality of your store.
  • You don’t mind spending a couple of hours setting things up, and you’re not afraid to handle the tasks required on your own (or you’ve hired someone to do this for you).
  • (Optionally) You have only minimal budget to start with, and you want to do everything on your own.

Source: ecommerce-platforms.com

At TJ-WEBS, our goal is to provide awesome & affordable web design to individuals, small businesses and non-profits. We love the little guys, the newbies, the novices… the up-and-comers, the mom and pops and the have nots. We believe beautiful websites can be affordable and accessible to everyone. From basic blogs to full blown e-Commerce sites, we offer affordable websites to all.

Tools We Use And Recommend

Managed WordPress Hosting
Engineered for speed, built for security, crafted for WordPress. Feature-rich managed WordPress hosting with premium support, starting at just $3.95/month.
Elegant Themes with Visual Builder
WordPress Themes That Empower 401,632 Customers.  Get The Ultimate WordPress Toolkit For Web Design Professionals And Business Owners
Constant Contact
With Constant Contact, you can create effective email marketing and other online marketing campaigns to meet your business goals
whitespark
Whitespark builds tools and provides services that help businesses and agencies with local search marketing. We live and breathe local SEO and we’re known far and wide for writing and speaking on it.
Udemy
Be Able. From programming to photography, take in-depth online courses and meet any challenge with skill.

How Much Does A Website Cost? – Free WordPress Website

All websites that TJ Webs works on are created with WordPress.  WordPress does offer a method for creating a free website.  While there are other free website options, we will limit our discussion in this article to what we know – WordPress.

WordPress is the most popular blogging platform out there.  And over the years, it has become the go-to solution for non-blog websites as well. The data doesn’t lie.

There are two sides to “WordPress,” and they can be quite confusing for someone not familiar with the topic.

WordPress.com is an online platform where you can go, sign up, and create your website/blog all in one place.  All you need to do is register for a free account, choose your subdomain (example: yourwebsite.wordpress.com), pick a free theme and start adding your content.

WordPress.org is an open source software.  To launch a website with it, you need to first download the software, and then install it on your own web server (or a web server you’re renting from a third-party like SiteGround).

What are the main differences between WordPress.com vs WordPress.org?

1.  You get a full domain on WordPress.org but only a sub-domain on WordPress.com

Sub-domain is a part of larger domain. For example, my site domain name is StartBloggingOnline.com.  If my sub-domain is MyFreeBlog, then my full domain name will be MyFreeBlog.StartBloggingOnline.com.

When you go and sign up on WordPress.com you’ll get a domain name like: YourNewBlog.WordPress.com.  But when you go with self-hosted WordPress, you’ll have your own domain name like: YourNewBlog.com 

On the downside, your blog address will cost you around $10 per year. It’s not much, but still some money.

2. WordPress.com has more limitations than WordPress.org

WordPress.com has around 100 free themes to choose from, WordPress.org (self-hosted) has around 1500 free themes to choose from.  The same goes with plugins and different add-ons.  In short, you’ll have some limits which doesn’t allow you to really customize your blog.

You won’t be able to add AWeber, GetResponse or Mailchimp applications to gather e-mails and build lists for business purposes.

You won’t be able to add different plugins and themes that can make your blog look “cool” and unique.

Your blog will also be limited in size. If you go too heavy on posting images and videos, you might need to sign up as their premium customer which costs $99/year.

3. You don’t own the content on WordPress.com

Yup, you heard it right.  You don’t own the content nor the blog you’re posting on. WordPress owns it, thus they can shut it down whenever they want to.  And that’s the main reason it’s free.

On a self-hosted WordPress, you’ll own your content and you can even sell it as a website/blog without any permissions.  You can place ads and even monetize your blog – you can’t do that on a free WordPress platform.

4. People take you more seriously on WordPress.org

Don’t get me wrong. WordPress.com is perfect for classroom blogs or blogs that won’t be used more than 2 months.

But when you want to be a serious blogger (individually or for company), you need to have your own domain name and own hosting.

WordPress.org vs. WordPress.com – a more in-depth take

 
WordPress.com WordPress.org
Offers free hosting, but limits your website space to 3GB. Doesn’t come with free hosting. You’ll have to look for a host yourself, and pay for it separately.
Gives you a free subdomain. Something like YOURSITE.wordpress.com. If you want a custom domain, you’ll need to upgrade to a paid plan.  You need to get a custom domain on your own (additional costs apply).
You get basic security and backups handled for you. There’s some level of security from your web host, but for the most part, you need to secure your website yourself (through third-party WordPress plugins). Same goes for backups – those you need to enable via plugins as well (one of the best ways to do so is with the “Personal” plan of the Jetpack plugin).
Everything about the technical performance of your website is handled by the team behind WordPress.com. If something doesn’t work at some point, you can’t do anything but wait for the team to fix the issue. You get to choose the plugins and the performance settings of your website. It requires some work, but you are in full control of what happens on your site.
Offers a limited number of themes for you to choose from. It comes with limited customization options as well. Lets you take and install any theme you want, and also do all the customization you want. You can also create your own themes if you know your way around PHP source code.
Doesn’t allow you to use any third-party plugins. You only get a narrow range of pre-built features. You can’t add extra features to your site that aren’t already provided by the default WordPress.com environment. WordPress.org offers you the freedom to install any free or premium plugin you want. This is vital if you want to customize your site to the point where it fits your needs hand-in-glove.
You can’t have your own ads on your site. However, WordPress.com displays *their* ads on your site – that’s the price you pay for having the platform for free. You can have as many ads and as many forms of monetization as you like (also, choose any ad service you want). The good news is that you keep 100% of your earnings.

 

WordPress.com vs WordPress.org – What’s your choice?

If you are serious about blogging, you want to do it long-term and/or earn some money then get yourself a self-hosted WordPress blog.

If you have no intentions to blog more than a few months, then set up a limited free blog on WordPress.com.

At TJ-WEBS, our goal is to provide awesome & affordable web design to individuals, small businesses and non-profits. We love the little guys, the newbies, the novices… the up-and-comers, the mom and pops and the have nots. We believe beautiful websites can be affordable and accessible to everyone. From basic blogs to full blown e-Commerce sites, we offer affordable websites to all.

Tools We Use And Recommend

Managed WordPress Hosting
Engineered for speed, built for security, crafted for WordPress. Feature-rich managed WordPress hosting with premium support, starting at just $3.95/month.
Elegant Themes with Visual Builder
WordPress Themes That Empower 401,632 Customers.  Get The Ultimate WordPress Toolkit For Web Design Professionals And Business Owners
Constant Contact
With Constant Contact, you can create effective email marketing and other online marketing campaigns to meet your business goals
whitespark
Whitespark builds tools and provides services that help businesses and agencies with local search marketing. We live and breathe local SEO and we’re known far and wide for writing and speaking on it.
Udemy
Be Able. From programming to photography, take in-depth online courses and meet any challenge with skill.

Why Use SiteGround Hosting For Your Website

It’s hard to find an honest SiteGround review anywhere on the web.  Heck, it’s pretty hard to find honest reviews of any web hosting provider.  Because of that, we get asked about web hosting a lot.  Here are a just a few of the reasons we recommed SiteGround for your hosting needs.

Speed

SiteGround has 3 global datacenters. One in the Netherlands, one in Chicago, and one in Singapore. That kind of distribution doesn’t exist in the managed WordPress hosting space yet, and as our customers begin reaching out from different parts of the world, this is becoming more important to us.

Combine that with free CloudFlare CDN and your website load faster in any part of the world by caching its content and distributing it over multiple data centers. When foreign visitors access your website, the CDN delivers the content much faster from the closest data center to them. Thanks to its wide network, CloudFlare also protects your site by identifying and blocking malicious traffic to it

Free Emails

You can have unlimited number of FREE email accounts at your domain name – e.g. you@yourdomain.com. You can also use forwarders and aliases that allow you to forward emails received to any of your email accounts to another mailbox. SiteGround Hosting includes the three most popular web-based mail clients: Horde, RoundCube and SquirrelMail, so you can access your email accounts from any computer with an Internet connection.  By Comparision, Google charges $5 per month for professional email names.

Free Website Transfer

If you already have an existing WordPress website, our technical experts will transfer all your files to us professionally and free of charge for one website. No hassle, no downtime and no efforts on your part.

Free Daily Backups

At SiteGround all of the Managed WordPress Hosting plans include free daily backups.  In case of emergency, you can request the latest backup copy we have created of your website. Each plan has a different number of backup copies that are saved, but there is most likey a plan that meets your backup needs.

Hosting Poll

Here’s a Facebook poll that was taken by the WordPress Hosting group. And here’s a screenshot of the full poll since you have to be a member of the FB group to see the poll…

SiteGround vs. Bluehost Poll

Reviews

While reviews can be biased towards the hosting company that the author is affilated with, SiteGround consistantly recieves great reviews so they must be doing something right.

Here are three articles for you to take a look at.

Hosting Facts SiteGround Review

The Webmaster SiteGround Review

Online Media Masters

Happy Hosting

At TJ-WEBS, our goal is to provide awesome & affordable web design to individuals, small businesses and non-profits. We love the little guys, the newbies, the novices… the up-and-comers, the mom and pops and the have nots. We believe beautiful websites can be affordable and accessible to everyone. From basic blogs to full blown e-Commerce sites, we offer affordable websites to all.

Tools We Use And Recommend

Managed WordPress Hosting

Engineered for speed, built for security, crafted for WordPress. Feature-rich managed WordPress hosting with premium support, starting at just $3.95/month.

Elegant Themes with Visual Builder

WordPress Themes That Empower 401,632 Customers.  Get The Ultimate WordPress Toolkit For Web Design Professionals And Business Owners

Constant Contact

With Constant Contact, you can create effective email marketing and other online marketing campaigns to meet your business goals

whitespark

Whitespark builds tools and provides services that help businesses and agencies with local search marketing. We live and breathe local SEO and we’re known far and wide for writing and speaking on it.

Udemy

Be Able. From programming to photography, take in-depth online courses and meet any challenge with skill.

Use UpdraftPlus To Save Backups To GoogleDrive

use updraftPlus to save backups in google drive

How to use UpdraftPlus to save backups in GoogleDrive in WordPress?

Taking regular backups of your site is extremely important. It can save you website if it ever gets hacked and then these backups can make your site live again in just few minutes.

UpdraftPlus plugin is one of the best and simple to use WordPress plugin for taking full backups of your blogs or websites and then restoring them easily. UpdraftPlus also allow you to easily Schedule or automate your Backups.

UpdraftPlus provides options to save your backup in various locations like:

  • Dropbox.
  • Google Drive.
  • Amazon S3.
  • FTP.
  • Rackspace.

There is Premium version of UpdraftPlus which provides additional functionality like Migrating Site, Multisite Support, Database Text Replace and many more.

Here we will be take a look at the process of configuring UpdraftPlus to upload backups to Google Drive.

Google Drive provides free storage of about 15 GB which is more than enough to store backups of small to medium websites.

The Process of configuring UpdraftPlus to store Backups in GoogleDrive is little lengthy by its totally worth the effort.

Here can follow these steps to setup the backup in UpdraftPlus:

 

Setting up UpdraftPlus to take backups.

 

updraft-setting-google-drive

Go to  Plugins –> UpdraftPlus – Backup/Restore –> Settings  and you will see the UpdraftPlus Backup/Restore page. click  settings  option.

You can select Files Backup Schedule , Database Backup Schedule to schedule regular backup.

After that select  Google Drive  as shown in the above picture.

You need to create a new project for UpdraftPlus. SO log in to your Google Account and you can follow this link to go to your Google API console.

 

Create a new project.

updraft-google-api-console-1

Create a new Google project.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-2

Enter Project name and Project ID. if you want to get emails from Google, Select Yes otherwise NO.

You need to Agree to their Terms of Service. Press Create button to create a new project for your UpdraftPlus backups.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-3

Click  Drive API  link to proceed further.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-4

Click Enable to Enable the API.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-6-1

Go to  Drive UI Integration tab.

Enter the Application Name and Short Description and other information. and scroll down to see further options.

 

Add Icons and website url.

updraft-google-api-project-6-2

If you want to set an Icon for your Application then you can upload an image here. After that scroll down to see next set of options.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon

Same way If you want to set an  Icon  for your  Document  then you can upload an image here.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-4

Fill Open URL field with your website address and if you need additional options then you should configure them too. After this click  Save Changes.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-5

Now go to OAuth consent screen and enter your Email address and Product name.

Click Save to save the changes.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-6

Now select Credentials and click on OAuth client ID.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-9

In Client ID, select Web application as Application  type.

Enter Name (updraftPLUS)  for Client ID.
Enter your Website url in Authorised Javascript origins field.

To fill the Authorized redirect URIs field we need to copy the authorised redirect URI from UpdaftPlus plugin page.

So go back to the UpdraftPlus settings page.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-7

copy the authorised redirect URI text as shown in the above image. Go to Google API Console page.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-8

and paste it here as shown in the picture and finally click Create. It will generate the Client ID and Client secret key.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-10

You can find these Client ID and Client secret key by clicking the credentials as shown in above picture.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-11

You need to copy the Client ID and Client secret key values to enter them on the next step.

 

 

updraftplus-google-api-entry

Enter the Google Drive Client ID and Google Drive Client Secret Key that you copied in previous step in their appropriate fields. After that Click Save.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-12

Now you need to Click on the UpdraftPlus notice to authenticate your Google Drive Account.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-13

You should see the Success message after successful authentication of your Google Drive account.

You can now start taking your First Backup now By Clicking  Backup Now button.

 

Taking Backups

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-14

Include all the options that you think are necessary and click   Back Now   to proceed further.

 

 

updraft-google-api-project-app-icon-15

Backup is in Progress.

 

 

use updraftplus to save backups in google drive.
How to use updraftplus to save backups in google drive.

Go to your Google Drive account  to verify and you should see an UpdraftPlus folder.  Here all our backups will be stored from now on.

 

 

use updraftplus to save backups in google drive.
How to use updraftplus to save backups in google drive.

Restoring backups, you can choose from Database, Plugins and other options to restore them if ever needed.

 

 

use updraftplus to save backups in google drive.
how to use updraftplus to save backups in google drive.

Click Restore and you are good to go.

GoDaddy Email Forwarding

Many of my WordPress website clients have recently been running into email problems on their sites.  Email configurations that had been working previously just seem to break.

I don’t fully understand the issues but I suspect that some sort of email spam prevention sortware on the website host is responsible for the sudden change.  From the website Living With Beth I fund this statement:

I researched the problem some more and came across information deep in a forum post that seemed to point me in the right direction. Apparently, at some point, GoDaddy email add some powerful spam protections that make it impossible for GoDaddy managed WordPress to send emails unless they come from a GoDaddy-hosted email address.

The fix for this issue is dependent on the hosting company. For example, the fix for my Dreanhost clients has been different that what works for my GoDaddy hosted clients.  I used the Postman SMTP plugin for all the various hosts.  But the configuration is vastly different for each host.

On GoDaddy I set up a forwarding email accoount and configure the Postman SMTP plugin in the defaul mode to use the forwarding emaill address.

Here are the GoDaddy steps to set up the forwarding email.

WordPress on GoDaddy email problems? Here's how I fixed them.

To set up a GoDaddy email address for yourself, login to GoDaddy, then click Hosting at the top, then Email.

You should see a list of any email addresses your domains have. Click the Create button, and you’ll see a dialog box for creating a new email account.

WordPress on GoDaddy email problems? Here's how I fixed them.

If you click Change Plan, you can choose which domain you want to draw the email account from.

WordPress on GoDaddy email problems? Here's how I fixed them.

When you start typing the email address and hit the @ symbol, you’ll see a list of the available domains, including your managed WordPress one.

In the bottom pane where you see additional options, you can choose to forward emails from your new GoDaddy email to another address, and you can choose the size of the mailbox. Keep in mind that even if you choose the largest size available and have messages forwarded to another email box, you will need to check this mailbox periodically.

Otherwise, it will eventually fill up and stop accepting new messages. Forwarded emails will remain in the mailbox until you login to the actual mailbox and delete them.

WordPress on GoDaddy email problems? Here's how I fixed them.

Based on my own trial, error and research, I don’t think you’l

 

http://livingwithbeth.com/godaddy-email/

How Much Should A Custom WordPress Website Cost?

Freelancer rates

Beginner freelancer: $25-$40 per hour
Intermediate freelancer: $40-75 per hour
Good, experienced freelancer: $75 – $125 per hour
Excellent, in demand freelancer: $125 – $175 per hour
Specialist, best in industry: $175 – $400 per hour

Agency rates

Small market general agency: $50 – $75 per hour
Medium market general agency: $75 – $115 per hour
Medium market reputable agency: $115 – $150 per hour
Medium market high end agency: $150 – $175 per hour
Medium market best in industry agency: $175 – $225 per hour
Large market reputable agency: $150 – $175 per hour
Large market high end agency: $175 – $250 per hour
Large market best in industry agency: $200 – $275 per hour

See the great article at Post Status for the full report on how to price your website work

How to Create a Complete WordPress Backup for Free with BackWPup

First thing you need to do is install and activate BackWPup plugin. Upon activation, the plugin will display a welcome page. It will also add a BackWPup menu item in your WordPress admin sidebar.

BackWPup Menu

Creating Backup Jobs with BackWPup

Click on Add New Job to create an automated backup job for your WordPress website. Under General tab, provide a name for this job. This name will be used internally and will help you identify each backup instance. Under the Job Tasks section, select the type of tasks you want this to perform. Available tasks include database backup, file backup, WordPress XML export, Installed plugins list, optimize database tables and check database tables. If you just want to create backup of your website, then you can select all options except for optimize and check database tables.

Create a new backup job in BackWPup

Under backup file creation section, choose an archive type. The default option is tar.gz, however you can choose zip archive if you want. Below this, you will see Job Destination section. This is where your backups will be stored. BackWPup provides multiple options to store your backup files. It can store backup file on your server, send it via email, backup to FTP, backup to dropbox, amazon S3, Windows Azure, Rackspace, and Sugarsync. Whatever you do, DO NOT store the backups on your server. For the sake of this WordPress tutorial, we will be using DropBox.

Choose backup destination and compression

Scheduling Automated Backup in WordPress using BackWPup

Click on Schedule tab and choose how often do you want to backup your site. You can schedule it to run monhtly, weekly, or daily basis by choosing WordPress Cron option. Alternatively, you can choose to manually run the job, so that you can create on-demand backups of your site. For advance level users there are more choices like using a URL to start the job externally using some other software or starting the job using WP-CLI, a command line interface for WordPress. For beginner level users we would highly recommend scheduling a daily or weekly backup by choosing WordPres Cron option.

Scheduling automatic backups in WordPress using BackWPup

What to Backup?

Click on DB Backup tab to select which tables you want to be included in the backup. Sometimes WordPress plugins create their own tables into your database, most of the time this data is not crucial and you may not need it. Unchecking these tables will reduce your backup size. However if you don’t know what you are doing, then keep all tables selected.

Select or exclude tables from backup job

Under the Files tab you can select which directories and files you want to include in the backup job. We would recommend that you do not backup core WordPress files. Instead, only backup your wp-content/uploads folder. Uncheck Backup root folder. Exclude any folders in wp-content folder that you don’t want. For example, sometimes plugins will create their own directories inside wp-content folder to store plugin data. You can exclude these folders if you want.

Select or Include files and directories from backup job

Saving WordPress Backups To Dropbox

Depending on what you chose as destination for your backup, you will see a tab for it. In this tutorial we will show you how to automatically upload your WordPress backup to Dropbox using BackupWP plugin. So click on Dropbox tab and then click on Reauthenticate (full Dropbox).

Authenticate with Dropbox to save your backups to Dropbox

This will take you to the Dropbox website where you will be asked to provide your username and password. After signing in, DropBox will ask for your permission to grant BackWPup access to your DropBox account.

Giving BackWPup Access to your Dropbox account

After that, the plugin will take care of the rest.

Creating Multiple WordPress Backup Jobs using BackWPup

You can create multiple backup jobs with BackWPup. For example, you can create a scheduled job to run on a daily or weekly basis to backup your WordPress Database and another job to run manually for backing up your WordPress files only. You can see all jobs created by you on BackWPup » Jobs page. You can run any of the backup jobs by clicking on Run Now link below the job, even for scheduled jobs. You can also edit settings for a job or delete it entirely.

Creating and managing multiple Backup Jobs

Running a Backup Job

When you execute a Backup Job manually by clicking on Run Now link, BackWPup will display the backup progress. Clicking on display working log, you can see what is going on in the background. If for some reason the backup job fails, then this log will also display the reason. You can also abort a job during the progress by clicking on abort button.

Running a manual backup job in BackWPup

Troubleshooting WordPress Backup Jobs in BackWPup

Running a backup job may cause extra load on your hosting server. This may result in unfinished backup jobs. Also on most shared hosting services, there is a limit on how much time or memory a script can consume. When your server stops BackWPup for crossing the time or memory limit, it waits for 5 minutes and then resumes the process. In this case, it would take a while for a backup job to finish.

The first thing you should do is increase your PHP memory limit, then go to BackWPup » Settings and click on the Jobs tab. Increase Maximum number of restries for job steps option. The default value is 3, you can increase it to 5 and see if this works for you. After that scroll down to Reduce server load option and select medium or minimum server load options.

Increasing memory and reducing server load for BackWPup

Final Thoughts

You are probably wondering if a good free plugin like BackWPup exist, then why do people pay for plugins like BackupBuddy or VaultPress. One of the reason is support. When you pay for a product, then you are guaranteed to get support. Another thing that we notice with both BackupBuddy and VaultPress is that they offer malware scanning. We use VaultPress because it is a 100% managed service. The backup is stored in their cloud server, and it is a pretty fool-proof setup.

We can not stress this enough that you need to back up your site regularly. Do not wait for your WordPress site getting hacked or infected with malware, start backing up now, so that you can swiftly restore WordPress from backup when the time comes. We hope that this guide helped you automate your WordPress backups. Let us know which WordPress backup solution you use by leaving a comment below.

Source: WP Beginner

Primal Trading Company

The Primal Trading web site was developed by TJ-WEBS.  Here is a statement from the Primal Trading Company owners.

We are a husband and wife team with a deep sense of responsibility to help others where we can. Our goal is to do our part in helping to eliminate poverty around the world. This is also the mission of many organizations and businesses that see the value of establishing and maintaining fair trade practices.

Fair trade means that everybody who participates in the transaction of goods is treated with mutual respect and paid a wage that helps to ensure a decent quality of life. Professional artisans from impoverished areas rely on an expanded market, like ours, to provide better lives for their families and communities.

At Primal Trading Company, we desire to continually bring even more awareness of this topic to consumers who might not yet fully understand the impact of their purchasing habits and also to serve the customers who are already dedicated to incorporating fair trade standards into their daily lives.

We are very open to discussion and criticism so please feel very free to personally contact us if you are interested in such conversations.

Thank you!

Ki and Molly

Primal Trading Company

6 Steps to Building a WordPress Maintenance Business

By Stephen Altrogge

Pro Ebook group

Recurring revenue is the Shangri-La for business owners. Rather than scrapping and fighting and hunting for new clients, you have the same clients coming to you again, providing you with a steady stream of income. It takes away the stress of having to dig up new streams of revenue and allows you to start planning ahead.

But if you’re a WordPress designer or developer, you may be a bit perplexed about this whole “recurring revenue” thing. You make your money when clients need something new, like a website refresh for a site that looks like it was designed when MySpace was hot. You essentially have to wait for them to decide they want to change things. The whole idea of regular income feels like a mystery.

We’ve got some good news. Using the WordPress skills you already have, you can add WordPress maintenance to your business model. Building a WordPress maintenance business gives you the steady income you need while also allowing you to continue the development or design you’re already doing (if you desire).

In this article, we’re going to take a deep dive into the what, why, and how of building your own WordPress maintenance business. Buy the end, you’ll have a firm grasp on how to launch yours.

Step #1: Choose Which Services You’ll Offer

First, you’ll want to choose which services you’re going to offer clients. Before you can offer maintenance services to your clients, you need to know what you’re going to offer. The options here are numerous, including:

  • Website registration and hosting: They need to have this anyway, so why not incorporate this into the services you offer?
  • Security: You know what can happen when a site gets hacked. This is a huge problem that’s only going to get bigger.
  • Backups: Every site should be backed up on a regular basis. If something goes terribly wrong, the only way to restore it is from a backup.
  • Ongoing design and development tweaks to the site: Your clients will want things to be changed. You can offer these changes as part of a monthly package rather than needing to start a new project every time.
  • Content changes and creation. Some of your clients won’t be comfortable creating and uploading their own content. You can charge them to do so.
  • Social media management. Your clients probably know they need a social media presence but some may not know now to do it.

There are numerous other options you can offer, such as analytics, email marketing, online advertising, and consultation. Choose the services that will generate the most revenue while requiring the least additional work to what you’re already doing.

If you choose to offer only maintenance services, you have the option of partnering up with other designers and developers who aren’t interested in the maintenance side of things.

Step #2: Determine Your Pricing Model

The next step is to determine how much you’ll charge for your maintenance services. Before you can do this, there are several factors you need to take into consideration.

What are your monthly expenses? You must be able to cover your monthly and annual expenses, allow space for slow periods and client acquisition, as well as take into account your own margin. Don’t underestimate this or you’ll end up charging too little, which is difficult to back out of once you’ve offered it to clients.

How much does your competition charge? Evaluate your competition and then determine how you’ll stack up. Don’t necessarily try to offer the lowest price, especially if you’re offering superior services.

What service tiers will you offer? Creating several tiers of services at different price points allows you to take advantage of higher paying customers who want superior services while also offering a less expensive option to those with budget restrictions. Additionally, if you start a client at a lower tier you can slowly nudge them toward choosing more services.

As you negotiate with your clients, don’t let them determine the price. They probably don’t have a true understanding both of what you offer and what services like yours normally cost. Plus, there is always someone will to offer bad service at a lower price. Don’t engage in a race to the bottom.

Also, always ensure you plan for things going bad. You will encounter problems that take an inordinate amount of time, so factor those events into your price.

Step #3: Promote Your Services

Now that you’ve established what you’re going to offer and how much you’re going to charge, it’s time to start telling the world. The first step is to create a detailed “Services” page on your website. This is going to be the primary place you send potential clients who are interested in hiring you.

Here are some key things to consider when crafting your services page:

It’s all about the benefits. While you certainly want to describe the specific services you offer, you should spend far more time focusing on how your services will massively improve the lives of your customers. Remember, ultimately you’re selling peace of mind. Your backup, security, optimization, and other services allow the customer to know that everything will keep working smoothly. Paint a picture of the good life when discussing services you offer.

Set yourself apart. You need to be able to set yourself apart from your competitors, either through price, number of services, quality of service, attention to detail, or some other factor. Don’t be afraid to explicitly say why you’re a better choice.

Press in on the pain. Acknowledging specific customer pain points allows you to offer the solution to the pain. It shows customers that you have very pointed solutions to their difficult issues.

Make it easy to contact you. This should be obvious, but it’s neglected far too often. You want new clients, so don’t make it difficult to contact you. Put your contact form front and center.

Another simple way to advertise your services is to begin promoting them to your circles on social media. There’s a significant chance that at least one of your contacts will want or know someone who wants WordPress maintenance services.

Step #4: Explain The Importance Of Maintenance To Your Existing Clients

Unless your clients are particularly tech savvy, they’re probably not going to understand why they need someone to perform maintenance on their website. After all, this is a website we’re talking about, not a high performance car engine. They’re already paying you to create something nice for them, so why should they have to pay you to maintain it as well?

A big step in building a WordPress maintenance business is taking the time to explain to your clients why they need maintenance in the first place. Some simple talking points here include:

  • Site Optimization – Few things create problems like sites that aren’t optimized. If a site takes too long to load, visitors will leave quickly and Google can even penalize it, resulting in lower search rankings.
  • Peace of Mind – It’s highly likely that if your clients tried to change settings on the site, they would completely screw up the site. By entrusting all those functions to you, they ensure that their site continues functioning properly and that all necessary updates get made.
  • Your Expertise – Your clients don’t want to spend countless hours trying to figure out things you can handle in a matter of moments. You are offering expert services to them which will dramatically cut down on the amount of time they must spend on maintaining their website.

The arguments in favor of regular maintenance aren’t complicated or difficult to understand, but they’re probably not obvious to those who aren’t tech savvy. Patiently take the time to explain these things to them and help them see that this truly is a worthwhile investment.

There are some relatively ways to get existing clients into a maintenance contract.

  • Offer discounts for a limited time. Offering the first month, or several months at a discounted rate are a great way to entice customers to buy in to the idea of maintenance. Plus, once they see the value of what you offer, they’re more likely to stay on at the higher price. Just be very clear about when the price will increase and how much it will increase.
  • Include maintenance in project budgets. If you’re doing a design or development project, include a year of maintenance in the initial proposal. This takes care of the project support that most developers offer.
  • Offer a limited trial. Similar to above, offering a trial period of maintenance support in place of standard post-launch support is a simple ways to get customers in the maintenance mindset.

We don’t recommend free support for clients. They’ll latch on to that and be resistant to paying for maintenance services when the time comes.

Step #5: Select Your Tools

Once you’ve gotten some clients, you’ll need a set of tools to help you perform the maintenance tasks. Those tools should include:

Customer Relationship Management (CRM): A CRM system allows you to track your clients, as well as a variety of data associated with those clients. This can be done in a simple spreadsheet, although you may want to use something more sophisticated as your business grows.

Support System: You need to have a way to process help requests from clients, and that’s where a ticketing system comes into place.

Local Desktop Environment: When making changes to a site, you want to be able to test those changes before making them live. That happens in the local desktop environment. DesktopServer is built specifically for WordPress.

Reliable Editor: You’re going to need a full Integrated Development Environment to allow you to make changes to any code on the back end.

Browser Developer Tools: You’ll be using these for inspecting the sites you manage. Chrome and Firefox come with their own set of tools.

FTP: When uploading and download files to the sites, you’ll rely heavily on an FTP client.

Uptime Monitoring: Your clients can’t afford to have their sites go down, and this tool will allow you to monitor the uptime of those sites.

Security: No explanation needed. If one of your clients sites get hacked, you’ll need to act quickly to determine where the hack occurred and how to fix it.

Analytics: Google Analytics allows you to monitor key stats about who is visiting the site, where they’re coming from, etc.

Step #6: Demonstrate Your Value To Your Clients

To keep clients returning month after month, you’re going to want to show them the value of what you’re doing. A simple way to do this is to generate regular reports for them that show what you’ve done for them and how it has helped them. These reports can include:

  • Monthly traffic (include SEO generated traffic to show the value of your optimizations)
  • Top content (especially content you’ve created or promoted)
  • Security hacks thwarted
  • Mobile traffic as well as mobile optimizations you’ve made
  • Uptime reports (demonstrates your reliability)

These types of reports show your clients the value of the services you offer.

Conclusion: What Are You Waiting For?

Running a WordPress maintenance business isn’t all kittens and pots of gold at the end of rainbows. You will have support issues to handle and irate clients who don’t understand what you’re doing. Demonstrating patience, grace, and humanity in these scenarios allows you to handle these problems without burning bridges unnecessarily.

But in spite of these challenges, a maintenance business is an outstanding way to generate recurring revenue and get out of the typical feast or famine cycle that afflicts most freelancers. It also allows you to add additional value to clients and extend the length of business relationships.

Source: Site Point

This article was sponsored by GoDaddy. Thank you for supporting the sponsors who make SitePoint possible.

Increasing the WordPress Memory Limit

If your site is having memory limit issues, you may be able to adjust this yourself.  Make a simple change to either the wp-config.php, PHP.ini, or .htaccess file to increase the WordPress Memory Limit. I use the File Manager on the GoDaddy Hosting page to make the change.  You may need to use FTP if your host does not provide some sore of file editing capability.

To adjust it on your own, here are some things you can try:

1. Edit your wp-config.php file.

Add this to the very bottom, right before the line that says, “Happy Blogging”:

define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');
WordPress memory can be different from the server – you need to set this regardless of server memory settings

http://codex.wordpress.org/Editing_wp-config.php#Increasing_memory_allocated_to_PHP

2. Edit your PHP.ini file.

If you have access to your PHP.ini file, change the line in PHP.ini
If your line shows 64M try 256M:

memory_limit = 256M ; Maximum amount of memory a script may consume (64MB)

3. Edit your .htaccess file.

If you don’t have access to PHP.ini try adding this to an .htaccess file:

php_value memory_limit 256M

4. If none of the above works then you would need to talk to your host about having them increase your memory limit.